Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies in infants and young children1. Children diagnosed with an egg allergy must avoid whole and raw eggs as well as all foods containing eggs. Eggs, however, are found in many different foods. For this reason, it is important to check the labels on all foods to make sure they are suitable for your child.

The following foods and ingredients contain eggs and egg protein. These foods should be avoided by children with an egg allergy.

 

Albumen Glaze (on baked goods e.g. pies, buns) Ovomucoid

 

Apovitellin Globulin Ovovitlen
Avidin Imitation egg products Pancakes, pikelets
Dried eggs Livetin Pastries i.e. tarts, pies and foods made from choux pastry
Egg, whole egg, white or yoke Lysozyme Pavlova
Egg noodles & egg pasta Macaroons Powdered egg
Egg solids Meringue and meringue mix Quiche
Favoproteins Omelette, frittata, soufflé Waffles
French toast Ovalbumin
Fritters Ovomucin
  • Empty egg boxes and eggshells also should not be touched by those with an egg allergy as this may trigger an allergic reaction
  • Egg Lecithin (additive 322) is usually tolerated by most people with an egg allergy

Please note that this is not a complete list of all foods containing eggs and egg protein. It is important to check the labels of all manufactured foods before consuming.

Table adapted from Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy ‘Dietary Avoidance for egg allergy’.

The following foods and ingredients may contain eggs and egg protein. It is important to check the label on these foods. If the food contains egg, it should be avoided by those with an egg allergy.

Baked goods, cereals and grain products – biscuits, breads (including naan bread), cakes and cake mixes, commercial icing on cakes, croissants, doughnuts, marzipan, mock or butter cream, muffins, pasta, tarts and pastries

Beverages – Eggnog, malted drinks

Desserts– custard, dessert mixes, ice cream and frozen desserts, mousse, puddings and milk puddings

Meat, fish, poultry and alternatives – Processed meats i.e. meat loaf, meat balls, hamburgers. Battered, breaded or crumbed meats i.e. chicken schnitzel

Confectionery and sweet dishes – All types of confectionery, including soft centred chocolates, lollies, caramel and nougat

Sauces and condiments – Most sauces including béarnaise, hollandaise, tartare and mayonnaise. Lemon butter, salad dressings

Miscellaneous – Asian dishes, battered, breaded and crumbed foods, dips, fried rice, pie filling, prepared soups and consommè

Please note that this is not a complete list of all foods containing eggs and egg protein. It is important to check the labels of all manufactured foods before consuming.

Egg substitutes for cooking

Many recipes require the use of eggs. When cooking at home, it is often possible to include an egg substitute that will be appropriate for children with an egg allergy. Unfortunately when a large number of eggs are needed for a dish, like frittata, quiche and meringue, sometimes it may not be possible to use a substitute.

The role of eggs in cooking is usually as a binder (to hold it together) or as a leavening agent (to help it rise), or sometimes eggs play both roles. Considering what the role of the egg is in your recipe will help you to determine the best substitute.

Commercial egg replacers are available from supermarkets and are usually found in the health food aisle. They can act as both leavening and binding agents. Egg replacers can be used in baking, for fillings, for batters and custards.

To make your own egg substitute for baking, the following recipes can be used. Each is equivalent to one egg1:

1tsp baking soda + 1 tbsp. water + 1 tbsp. vinegar

1 ½ tbsp. water + 1 ½ tbsp. oil + 1tsp baking powder

When the purpose of the egg is to act as a binding agent, the following can be used. Again, each is equivalent to one egg1:

¼ cup mashed potato or pumpkin

½ cup mashed banana or pureed apple (or other pureed fruit)

Sometimes recipes for baked goods will call for an egg glaze, to be brushed on the item before baking. For these recipes, melted butter or margarine can be used as a substitute.

 

Please note, this fact sheet does not list all foods containing egg. Parents should check the labels of all foods prior to feeding to your child with egg allergy.

Eggs are found in many different foods. For this reason, it is important to check the labels on all foods to make sure they are suitable for your child.

 

  1. ASCIA 2014. Dietary Avoidance- Egg Allergy. Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. Viewed 26 June 2016. http://www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy/ascia-dietary-avoidance-for-food-allergy/egg
  2. Australian and New Zealand Food Standards Code. 2016. Standard 1.2.3. Information Requirements- warning statements, advisory statements and declarations. Federal Register of Legislation. Viewed 21 June 2016. https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2016C00481